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Ambulight PDT is a light-emitting sticking plaster for the treatment of non-melanoma skin cancer (NMSC) Simple and easily applied, the plasters are used in Photodynamic therapy (PDT) which is an established alternative to surgery for many forms of skin cancer.

PDT has become a key treatment for skin cancers, an established and growing health issue in many regions of the world. The incidence of non-malignant skin cancer continues to grow rapidly and now affects up to 15% of the UK, up to 40% of the USA, and up to 75% of the Australian populations during their lifetimes. The number of skin cancer lesions requiring treatment is doubling every ten years, as individuals live longer and are affected by the consequences of excessive sun exposure.
Ambulight- action kitchen
/>Photodynamic Therapy has become a key treatment for skin cancers and its use is expanding. PDT is being more widely adopted as it shows greater cost effectiveness and excellent cosmetic outcome while reducing secondary issues such as infection. This is reflected in the latest British Association of Dermatologists guidelines for the treatment of Bowen’s disease in which the role of PDT has been significantly upgraded.

PDT is a three-step process involving:

  • The application of a pharmaceutical to the skin
  • Absorption of the pharmaceutical into the skin and then subsequent conversion of the drug to an active photosensitiser, typically this takes 3 hours
  • Followed by controlled exposure of light via an external source. The external light source induces a photoactive reaction which activates the drug and destroys the skin cancer cells.

Ambulight Multiple Devices on Arm

PDT treatment avoids the scarring associated with surgical removal of the tumour and the need for an in-patient hospital stay; however a conventional PDT treatment still requires the use of external light sources and often a hospital visit.

Conventional PDT light sources are expensive and cumbersome. Consequently the use of PDT has largely been limited to hospital outpatient services where costs can be high and the service inconvenient for the patient.

The Ambulight PDT light source is different from the conventional light sources. It is taped to the patient’s skin and is small enough to allow movement whilst undergoing a PDT treatment. Once the Ambulight PDT device is attached to the patient and activated, no further input from medical personnel is required.

Ambulight PDT has the following features:

  • A single use device, packaged as a disposable dressing, it is simple to set up with the patient
  • Wearable low powered light source technology allows greater freedom of movement during treatment
  • Low light intensity – which has the potential to reduce pain
  • A high uniformity of light, wavelength matched to the PDT cream and treatment protocol
  • Convenient for patient, medical professional and healthcare provider

Clinical Trials

Ambicare’s prototype light sources have been used in a pilot clinical trial at the internationally renowned Photobiology Unit of Ninewells Hospital, Dundee, Scotland. This was published in the British Journal of Dermatology in June 2009.

“An open pilot study of ambulatory photodynamic therapyusing a wearable low-irradiance organic light-emitting diode light source in the treatment of nonmelanoma skin cancer”

Authors: S.K. Attili, A. Lesar, A. McNeill,* M. Camacho-Lopez,* H. Moseley, S. Ibbotson, I.D.W. Samuel* and J. Ferguson , Photobiology Unit, Department of Dermatology, Ninewells Hospital, Dundee DD1 9SY, U.K.*Organic Semiconductor Centre, SUPA, School of Physics and Astronomy, University of St Andrews, North Haugh, St Andrews KY16 9SS, U.K.

Use of Ambicare’s production devices have been used in case study on pain in low irradiance PDT and reported in a letter to the Journal of the American Academy of Dermatology July 2011.

“Irradiance is an importnant determinant of pain experienced during topical photodynamic therapy”

Authors: S. Ibbotson, Photobiology Unit, Department of Dermatology, Ninewells Hospital, Dundee DD1 9SY, U.K.

Click here to read an abstract of the article

Information for use

Ambulight PDT has specific instructions for use (IFU). These can be downloaded for further information. Ambulight PDT Instructions for use – English

Certification

The Ambulight PDT has received a medical device CE mark for marketing authorisation in the EU.

How is Ambulight PDT Different
  • Convenient for patient, medical professional and healthcare provider
  • Potential to increase throughput and access to PDT treatment
  • Designed to help reduce potential pain

Ambulight PDT, the company’s PDT skin cancer light source, is designed as a simple disposable dressing to deliver a single PDT treatment.

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What is PDT?

PDT is a multi-step process involving the application of a photosensitive drug followed by controlled exposure to a selective light source which activates daughter compound of the drug and destroys the diseased cells. PDT treatment is less invasive and avoids the scarring associated with surgical removal of the tumour and the need for an in-patient hospital stay.

Further reading on skin cancer can be found at:

Skin Cancer Foundation

Cancer Backup

Medline Plus

Cancer Research UK


What is PDT?

PDT is a milti-step process involving; (i) the application of a pharmaceutical to the skin, (ii) absorption of the pharmaceutical into the skin and then subsequent conversion of the drug to an active photosensitiser, typically this takes 3 hours, (iii) followed by controlled exposure of light via an external source.

The external light source induces a photoactive reaction which activates the drug and destroys the skin cancer cells.

PDT treatment avoids the scarring associated with surgical removal of the tumour and the need for an in-patient hospital stay; however a conventional PDT treatment still requires the use of external light sources and often a hospital visit.


Alternative Treatments

As well as PDT existing treatments for pre-malignant skin disease include: Surgical excision, Cautery, Cryotherapy, and Topical Creams.

Read about alternative treatments on the following websites:

NHS

My Dr

Cancer Center

Macmillan

If you would like to get more information on how to access PDT treatment then ask your General Practitioner or Dermatologist about the procedure.

Distributor Information

If you would like to distribute Ambulight PDT then please contact Ambicare.

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How is PDT treatment carried out?

The 5-ALA or methyl-ALA cream will then be applied and kept in place with a see-through plastic dressing. Depending on the nature of the lesion being treated, you will have the device applied and light treatment will take place over a period of about 3 hours.

Treatment is usually repeated one week later, although this can be longer in some circumstances.

How is the therapy given?

A special type of cream is applied to the area that needs treatment. This is left in place for 3 to 6 hours. The cream (5-aminolevolinulic acid (5-ALA) or methyl-aminolevolinulic acid (methyl-ALA) is taken up by the abnormal skin cells and converted into a light sensitive chemical. A red light source is then used to provide the light component needed to activate the chemical which then results in clearing the abnormal cells.

What are the advantages of PDT over other forms of treatment?

The treatment, which generally gives a good cosmetic result, is much less invasive than surgical excision or some of the more irritant cream approaches.

What are the side effects of PDT treatment?

During treatment you may experience a discomfort, although with the longer duration light treatment patch, this is unlikely to be significant.

Some pigmentation (a bit like tanning) may follow the treatment and usually settles over a number of months.

If two treatments are unsuccessful, repeat treatment will be considered and this usually occurs 12 weeks after your first 2 treatments.

Alternative therapies for these type of skin lesions include liquid nitrogen (cryotherapy), topical creams, or a surgical approach.

What is PDT?

PDT is a treatment for premalignant and skin tumours as well as selected skin conditions such as persistent viral warts. The premalignant skin tumours include actinic keratosis and Bowen’s disease (intraepidermal squamous cell carcinoma) as well as superficial basal cell carcinomas.